SWITZERLAND- HOME FOR SUICIDE TOURISM

The law on assisted suicide in Switzerland isn’t clear, according to a paper published in the journal Law, Ethics and Medicine this week. That’s why, the authors say, people from other countries are traveling to the state of Zurich for the “sole purpose of committing suicide.” They’re called suicide tourists.

Between 2008 and 2012, 611 “tourists” came to Switzerland for assisted suicide, according to the published analysis. They arrived from 31 countries around the world, though the majority were from Germany and the United Kingdom. “In the UK, at least, ‘going to Switzerland’ has become a euphemism for (assisted suicide),” the study authors write. “Six right-to-die organizations assist in approximately 600 cases of suicide per year; some 150-200 of which are suicide tourists.”

This published paper is the result of a pilot study completed for a larger project on assisted suicide in Switzerland being done by experts at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Zurich. Of the 611 assisted suicides identified during the four-year study period, just over 58% were women. The patients’ ages ranged from 23 to 97, researchers found, but the average age was 69. Close to half of the patients had a neurological disease. Others stated they had cancer, rheumatic disease or cardiovascular disease. Many had more than one condition.

In all but four cases, the assisted suicides were done using sodium pentobarbital. A fatal dose of this drug causes the patient to slip into a deep coma, according to DIGNITAS, a Swiss right-to-die organization that was involved in most of the identified cases.Sodium pentobarbital paralyzes the patient’s respiratory system, causing him or her to stop breathing.

The total number of suicide tourism cases dropped from 123 in 2008 to 86 in 2009. But the number of cases doubled between 2009 and 2012, to 172.
Assisted suicide laws around the globe are in flux as countries debate the pros and cons of allowing doctors to help terminally ill patients, or patients in a lot of pain, die.

In Switzerland, the study authors write, there are no rules to regulate under which conditions someone can receive assisted suicide, though medical professional codes allow it in certain circumstances.

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